How to Print on Cardstock With HP Printers

GSM stands for grams per square meter, which is the actual weight of the sheet. Printing on the proper card stock paper creates a quality look that shows you mean business. When you indicate a media type, the intake rollers adjust to accommodate the paper, reducing paper jams and increasing print quality. The Bottom Line Card stock means business! Paper Weights and Measures The difference between firm and flimsy business cards is all in the paper and the printing.

Staples carries many types of card stock paper, including environmentally friendly options. Finding the Right Card Stock Paper Weight and Size The weight rating of card stock is determined by the weight of sheets that measure 20 x 26 inches each.

Step 1: Choose the best paper weight by the kind of print job

For instance, regular everyday copy paper is most commonly referred to as a "20 lb. GSM stands for grams per square meter, which is the actual weight of the sheet. Notice that the 67lb Vellum Bristol has a lower gsm than a 65lb cover because they are two different categories of cardstocks and are scaled differently.

We hope this clarifies the difference between paperweights, and gives you a better understanding of what will fit your application best! With any further questions, please feel free to contact our paper professionals at !

View your shopping cart. In order from lightest weight to heaviest! Also the most popular business letterhead or stationary weight. Excellent for 2-sided printing with minimal show through.

Excellent for 2-sided printing with minimal show through, while being slightly heavier than the 28lb. Great for postcards, menus and posters. The average weight of an index card for heavier applications. Here are some basics: Terminology The world of paper has its own set of language, but we only need to identify a few common terms surrounding our goal to create the perfect professional business card. Bond Paper — Paper with rag content that was originally used for bonds and bank notes, often used for documents, letters, and general printing.

This is the stuff we usually by in sheet reams, measured in pounds. Bond paper is also called text weight paper. Cover Paper — Heavier card stock paper generally used for business cards, greeting cards, covers, menus, and postcards, etc. Cover paper is also called card weight paper, or card stock. Finishing — A texture that is applied to the business card, usually matte or glossy, in a range of varying textures metallic, antique, etc. Point — A point pt is used to indicate the thickness of cover card stock papers.

Common point sizes are written as 8 pt, 10 pt, 12 pt, and 14 pt paper. The higher the pt value, the thicker the paper. Thickness — The thickness of paper is measured in points pts , the thickness of a sheet in thousandths of an inch.

Card stock thicknesses generally range from pts pts flimsy, pts firm. Weight — Weight is the term used to measure the heaviness of paper in pounds, and based on grams per square meter.

Weights range from 20 to 80 pounds for bond paper and 50 to pounds for card stock. In terms of grams per square meter gsm , the range is usually from 60 gsm to gsm. Firm Card Stock Using firm card stock paper that is thicker feels more substantial and lends visual weight to your business card.

Printing on firm card stock. Thicker papers hold up well with heavy ink coverage used for bold typefaces and images. Industrial printers handle thicker papers better than desktop printers do. Printing on the proper card stock paper creates a quality look that shows you mean business. Reading from firm card stock. Reading text and viewing images created on firm card stock creates visual satisfaction, especially when good ink absorbs properly into quality card stock paper.

Handling firm card stock. Presenting your contact with a firm business card creates a valuable and lasting image for your business. Flimsy Card Stock Using flimsy card stock paper that is thin cheapens not only the business card but also the business image you may be seeking. Printing on flimsy card stock. Cheap paper will absorb ink and color while those papers that are coated will seem cleaner and brighter. Avoid printing on perforated papers from home. Ink quality appears poor and soaks into the flimsy card stock.

Reading from flimsy card stock. Often thin paper portrays cheap desktop printing from home. Perforations make unattractive borders, the overall appearance is cheap looking, and feel of the business card is disappointing. Handling flimsy card stock. Presenting your contact with a cheap, flimsy business card creates a poor image for your business. Paper Weights and Measures The difference between firm and flimsy business cards is all in the paper and the printing.

Explaining Paper Thickness vs. Selecting the Best The optimum card stock weight for most professional business cards resulting in the best quality printing, viewing, and handling can be narrowed down to just a few measurements.

The Bottom Line Card stock means business!

Step 2: Think about whether you want a cardstock paper weight, or a non-cardstock paper weight

12 rows · corresponding with each weight, refers to the thickness and sturdiness of the paper, not the . Paper Weights Explained. Please note that 80# text weight is a paper weight and 80# Cover weight is a card stock; although they have the same number marking them, they are two completely different papers. Popular Card Stock paper options: 65 lb Cover Weight/ gsm card stock. Read our intro before you try to choose the best paper weight for printing. PRODUCTS; MGX MINDSHARE; PRINT BLOG; Think about whether you want a cardstock paper weight, or a non-cardstock paper weight This is because not all coating types have the same paper weight options. For example: glossy paper has the option of 60 lb. glossy text.